Who We Are 2018-05-31T15:43:36+00:00

Who We Are

Miscarriage Support Auckland began as two women friends looking for answers while helping support each other after experiencing a miscarriage. In 1985 in response to a survey by a Women’s Magazine and encouragement of staff from National Women’s Hospital, they eventually formed a small independent group of volunteers of various ages who had all experienced the loss of their own babies.

No-one would ever have thought that miscarriage information would still be needed in this century but obviously, it is from the feedback and statistics. The Miscarriage Support Auckland website attracted over 20 million hits in the year 2016 – 2017. In February and March alone there were 2 million per month.

There are other miscarriage groups nation-wide in NZ (see ‘Independent Support Groups in NZ) and they all operate separately and differently. There are some dedicated to understanding miscarriage only and others offer miscarriage support plus a variety of other services e.g. Sands (whose address is at the top of our links list) have groups in many areas of NZ that hold baby loss meetings. They primarily offered support for stillbirths but expanded to other baby losses.

There are some dedicated to understanding miscarriage only and others offer miscarriage support plus a variety of other services e.g. Sands (whose address is at the top of our links list) have groups in many areas of NZ that hold baby loss meetings. They primarily offered support for stillbirths but expanded to other baby losses.

Our Aims

  • Provide emotional and psychological peer support for women and their families during and after miscarriage and also subsequent pregnancies. We offer them suggestions to help with healing, rather than rescue them, and giving them hope for the future.

  • Promote understanding in the community about the consequences of miscarriage and the resulting grief for women and their families.
  • Help to achieve a greater level of understanding on the part of health professionals about the psychological consequences of miscarriage on their patients, so they do not minimize or invalidate their patients’ feelings.
  • Act as advocate.
  • Promote a more appropriate name that would better describe and validate our feelings such as ‘premature stillbirth’. (As a group we feel the word ‘miscarriage’ does not adequately or sensitively describe what is often the trauma associated with an early pregnancy death. What we experienced was both a birth and a death.)

Understanding Miscarriage Pamphlets

brochureA4 pamphlet ‘Understanding Miscarriage’ which provides a synopsis of this website suitable for lay readers.

To order or download

Links checked June 2015